Water Restrictions

Last updated: 26 Jan, 2023 02:54pm

Current Status

About Restrictions

Water Q&A

Current Status

 

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About Water Restrictions

Water restrictions may occur in times of high use, such as summer months. They help conserve water for all users, make sure there is water available for fire fighting, if needed, and help our environment by remaining within our resource consent regulations.

Council records daily water usage of properties connected to the urban water supply to help monitor water levels during the summer months, or when restrictions are in place.  The maximum daily supply Council can currently maintain is 2500 cubic metres per day.

This website will keep you updated with the latest news if water restrictions are in place.

You can check our social media for updates. Follow Carterton District Council on Facebook for more.

You can also follow our daily water usage page.

Other places to keep an eye on include:

  • The water restriction wheel located on the Carters building, High Street.
  • Advertisements in the Carterton Crier.
  • Council pages in the Wairarapa Midweek.
  • Local radio.

 

Water Restrictions Questions & Answers

Why do we have restrictions here?

 The hot dry weather results in a shortage of water in the summer months. Restrictions help manage the water supply to ensure there is enough for everyone, to help with the community’s reaction to climate change, and ensure supplies are available for firefighting.

What are the water restriction levels?

Although we do not have fixed levels of water restrictions in Carterton, you can expect to see the following measures over summer:

  • Reduce your water use: Follow advice on how to save water and use it sparingly.
  • Sprinklers on alternate days: Sprinklers may be used on alternate days (odd numbered houses on odd days, even numbered houses on even days).
  • Handheld hoses only, on alternate days: A ban on sprinklers and irrigation systems. Handheld hoses may be used on alternate days (odd numbered houses on odd days, even numbered houses on even days).
  • Total ban: A ban on all residential outdoor water use.
Why should we follow restrictions when there are leaks that have not been fixed?

We are aware that leaks have an impact on water usage in the network, and we continue to work hard to locate and fix them as quickly as resources allow. However, following outdoor water restrictions, and conserving water where you can, makes the biggest impact on the level of demand.

What is Council doing to stop the need for restrictions?

We have infrastructure in place to ensure we can provide continuous clean water. We are increasing our leak detection work and new treatment technologies to improve the supply’s efficiency. The installation of our two 2,000,000 litre water tanks is progressing well. But our water usage remains dictated by the water available in the Kaipaitangata Stream, and Frederick Street bore. With a dry summer predicted, the conditions will mean a drain on our supply from the stream, aquifer, and bores.

Water restrictions are one of the measures required by consent agreements in place with Greater Wellington Regional Council for taking water, when water levels remain low. Saving water and limiting use is the only way to ensure supplies for firefighting in our community.

Why do restrictions last so long? Last year, they were in place from Christmas to Autumn?

Simply no rain means no water. We have infrastructure in place to ensure we can provide continuous clean water but with a dry summer predicted, the conditions will mean a drain on our supply from the stream, aquifer, and bores.

Why should we follow restrictions when there are leaks that have not been fixed?

We are aware that leaks have an impact on water usage in the network, and we continue to work hard to locate and fix them as quickly as resources allow. However, following outdoor water restrictions, and conserving water where you can, makes the biggest impact on the level of demand.

What is Council doing to stop the need for restrictions?

We have infrastructure in place to ensure we can provide continuous clean water. We are increasing our leak detection work and new treatment technologies to improve the supply’s efficiency. The installation of our two 2,000,000 litre water tanks is progressing well. But our water usage remains dictated by the water available in the Kaipaitangata Stream, and Frederick Street bore. With a dry summer predicted, the conditions will mean a drain on our supply from the stream, aquifer, and bores.

Water restrictions are one of the measures required by consent agreements in place with Greater Wellington Regional Council for taking water, when water levels remain low. Saving water and limiting use is the only way to ensure supplies for firefighting in our community.

Why do restrictions last so long? Last year, they were in place from Christmas to Autumn?

Simply no rain means no water. We have infrastructure in place to ensure we can provide continuous clean water but with a dry summer predicted, the conditions will mean a drain on our supply from the stream, aquifer, and bores.

Why do the council still water their gardens during restrictions?

Council uses stored rainwater (not suitable for drinking) for watering plants and gardens.

Why are the restrictions different around Wairarapa?

Simply, many of our urban settlements have their own water sources. Carterton’s differ as our main water source is the Kaipaitangata stream, so our strategy is around water supply of that stream.

I pay rates for my water so why should I use less?

Urban households pay an annual charge for use of up to 225 cubic metres. You are still able to access clean, drinking water during summer, however, we all need to conserve water during the dry, hot months to ensure there is enough water for everyone. No rain equals no water.

Can I still wash my car?

That’s dependent on current restrictions.